DTA TACOM Miscellaneous Repairs, Bldg. 230, US Army Tank Automotive Command

B230DetroitArn

DTA TACOM Miscellaneous Repairs, Bldg. 230, US Army Tank Automotive Command

Location: Detroit Arsenal, Warren, MI
Client: US Army
Completion: 2018
Value: $3.6M

Highlights:

  • Award of Excellence in Construction, Federal Government/Military/Under $10M category, Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC), Indiana/Kentucky Chapter, 2018
  • Multi-building renovation project
  • D-B interior reconfiguration resulted in 35 new offices, 4 printer/copier and file rooms, conference and team rooms, and 200 work stations

Role in US National Defense

The Detroit Arsenal (DTA) was the first manufacturing plant ever built for the mass production of tanks in the US, with its top production years occurring between 1941 and 1945. Today a portion of the original plant remains an active Army facility that houses several defense agencies, including the US Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) and the US Army TACOM Life Cycle Management Command.

Scope

CMS managed a design-build (DB) project for the complete renovation of Building 230, consisting of the Integrated Logistics Support Center (ILSC) North, ILSC East, and ILSC West. The renovation included interior finishes and furniture. Upon completing the base contract, CMS was granted the project’s single option, which included upgrading the existing HVAC system and installing an additional HVAC unit.

Interior Reconfiguration. The interior scope of work included extensive interior renovation. We added walls to create new rooms and spaces, as well as new fire-rated doors with frames and hardware. Interior renovations included installing carpet tile flooring and rubber base; painting all walls, columns, doors, and trim; installing new HVAC vents, diffusers and return grilles; refinishing all surfaces; and adding interior signage and fire extinguishers with cabinets to achieve the appearance of a completely new area. In the ILSC North area, we reconfigured the area for 15 new offices; 2 areas for printers, copiers, and file cabinets; a 12-person Conference Room with a video telecommunication conference (VTC) system; a kitchenette/break room; and 50 workstations. In the ILSC East area, we create 10 new offices; a printer/copier and file room; a 6-person Team Room; and 75 workstations. Finally, in the ILSC West area, we reconfigured the area for 10 new offices; a printer/copier and file room; and 75 workstations.

HVAC Renovation. The HVAC scope of work required a comprehensive analysis of the existing HVAC system to determine new ventilation requirements and new cooling load for the areas served by the AHU. Our analysis showed where supplemental cooling was needed to meet the new load requirements. The mechanical upgrades required that the air distribution system be reconfigured, and new heating and cooling zones created. A direct digital control (DDC) system was installed for maximum control of heating/cooling output by building managers from on- or off-site.

As the prime contractor for this $3.6M multiple-building renovation project, CMS was responsible for meeting all of the Army’s requirements and expectations for constructability, design, function, operation, and life span. We were also responsible for ensuring that the upgrades, repairs, and newly-installed systems integrated seamlessly with the Detroit Arsenal’s other buildings and finishes. Overall, we provided aesthetically pleasing, comfortable space for Army personnel that was like-new, durable, maintainable and sustainable.

Life, Health & Safety (LHS) B5900 Renovation and DLA Fuel Station

Bullisb5900

Life, Health & Safety (LHS) B5900 Renovation and DLA Fuel Station

Location: Joint Base San Antonio, Camp Bullis, TX
Client: US Army
Completion: 2017
Value: $3.3M

Highlights:

  • Design-Build
  • Renovate Life/Health/Safety (LHS) features of the building
  • Upgrade Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) Fuel Station

Role in US National Defense

Camp Bullis Military Training Reservation is a US Army training camp used primarily as maneuvering grounds for US Army, Air Force, and Marine combat units. It is also a field training site for the various medical units stationed at Brooke Army Medical Center at nearby Fort Sam Houston.

Scope

Since the land was purchased in 1906 by the US government, it has been used as a maneuvers and training grounds for troops based at Fort Sam Houston. As operations at Camp Bullis expanded, the number of buildings increased and all aspects of the facilities were continually renovated to reflect advances in technology and troop safety, including the installation of Life, Health, and Safety (LHS) systems in the 1960s. To maintain their efficacy and compliance, Camp Bullis LHS systems are regularly assessed and renovated as needed. This contract awarded a CMS 8(a) joint venture the opportunity to renovate the LHS system of Building 5900, a community service facility on Base that houses a theater and dressing room.

The scope of this project also included renovation of the DLA Fuel Station, which required placing easements and installing wastewater lines, new water lines, new fire hydrants, a concrete-encased duct for electrical lines, new overhead and underground electrical lines, asphalt driveway approaches, curbs, and gutters.

Renovation of the SGT JH Cooney US Army Reserve Center

USARCMilan

Renovation of the SGT JH Cooney US Army Reserve Center

Location: Milan, OH
Client: US Army
Completion: 2017
Value: $5.3M

Highlights:

  • Design-Build
  • Renovations and additions to 18,000 SF of US Army Reserve facility
  • Sustainable design and LEED features

Role in US National Defense

The US Army Reserve (USAR) is the federal reserve force of the US Army. Together the USAR and the Army National Guard constitute the Army element of the Reserve components of the US Armed Forces. USAR is a peacetime pool of trained Reserve officers and enlisted men for use in war. The Cooney US Army Reserve Center (USARC) in Milan, OH provides meeting and training facilities for regional support of Army Reserve personnel.

Scope

This design-build project renovates approximately 13,000-SF of an existing training building and an approximate 4,300-SF organizational maintenance shop. The project also requires an addition of approximately 710 SF to the organizational maintenance shop. Repairs to the facilities include extensive refurbishing of the HVAC systems, mechanical systems, security systems, electrical systems and all interior spaces. Physical security measures are incorporated in the design, including entry control points, maximum standoff distance from roads, parking areas, and vehicle unloading areas. Berms, heavy landscaping, and bollards are used to prevent access when standoff distances cannot be maintained.

This project includes a variety of sustainable design features for the building as well as low-impact design techniques for the site to help the project achieve LEED Silver Certification.

Building 212 Miscellaneous Repairs, US Army Tank Automotive Command

DetroitArsenal

Building 212 Miscellaneous Repairs, US Army Tank Automotive Command

Location: Detroit Arsenal, Warren, MI
Client: US Army
Completion: 2017
Value: $2.6M

Highlights:

  • Design-Build
  • Repair mechanical systems and infrastructure for eight Test Cells
  • Install new custom radius steel door with integrated wind/weather seals, sound and fire attenuation

Role in US National Defense

The Detroit Arsenal (DTA) was the first manufacturing plant ever built for the mass production of tanks in the US, with its top production years occurring between 1941 and 1945. Today a portion of the original plant remains an active Army facility that houses several defense agencies, including the US Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) and the US Army TACOM Life Cycle Management Command.

Scope

Building 212 at the Detroit Arsenal is a test facility consisting of eight Test Cells whose purpose is to test equipment in various types of environments as produced individually within the reinforced cells. The objective of this project was to repair features of each Test Cell in the facility to improve its individual performance and effectiveness.

CMS was responsible for repairing mechanical systems, including HVAC and HVAC infrastructure, including louvers, dampers, coils, valves, and DDC controls. Included in the scope were specialty doors for three of the cells. The use of a 40-ton crane was needed to move and install these large, heavy custom doors. Also included was pipe insulation, concrete placement, reinforcement of existing concrete, and HAZMAT abatement.

Excavation was required to place a flowable-fill sub-base prior to concrete placement. Concrete was placed, broom finished, and control joints were saw-cut as required.

Base Support for Hangars J and K Re-Paving, Cape Canaveral

CapeCanaveral

Base Support for Hangars J and K Re-Paving, Cape Canaveral

Location: Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL
Client: US Air Force
Completion: 2018
Value: $2.3M

Highlights:

  • Design-Build
  • Renovations and additions to 18,000 SF of US Army Reserve facility
  • Sustainable design and LEED features

Role in US National Defense

Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) is an installation of the US Air Force Space Command’s 45th Space Wing. The CCAFS Skid Strip provides a 10,000-foot runway close to the launch complexes for military aircraft delivering heavy and outsized payloads to the Cape. A number of American space exploration pioneering endeavors were launched from CCAFS, including the first US Earth satellite in 1958, first US astronaut in orbit (1962), and first US unmanned lunar landing (1966).

Scope

The primary scope of this design-build project was the removal and replacement of asphalt in the compound areas of Hangars J and K, the area outside to the main road, and a portion of the Technical Support Facility (TSF) parking area. Ancillary demolition work was performed, to include removing and over-paving existing site features, such as concrete pads. In addition to the paving work, CMS installed trailer tie-down anchors, a concrete utility trench with covers, pipe bollards, grounding and electrical vaults, light pole bases, and traffic signage.

New construction consisted of installing a new 1.5” potable water supply from Hangar J to the General Maintenance Building, and replacing two sanitary sewer lines with clean-outs tied into the existing sewer lines from Hangar J to the sewer manholes. Crews also relocated existing conduit and installed new 2.5” PVC communication conduit; removed and replaced portions of broken sidewalk and areas of concrete next to the building; corrected paved site elevations to eliminate drainage issues at the swale; installed new trailer tie-down anchors; and restriped new and renovated pavement.

Building 930 HVAC Repairs

B930FtPolk

Building 930 HVAC Repairs

Location: Fort Polk, LA
Client: US Army
Completion: 2017
Value: $3.6M

Highlights:

  • Design-Build
  • Demolish/remove existing HVAC system including process piping, electrical, mechanical
  • HAZMAT abatement

Role in US National Defense

Fort Polk, a US Army installation located in west central Louisiana, was built in World War II to serve as a basic training post. Today the Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC) and other combat divisions on Base improve unit readiness by providing realistic arms training across a full spectrum of conflict scenarios.

Scope

Building 930 at Fort Polk houses the Bayou Theater, which serves the Base in the capacities of conference hall, large-scale training room, and entertainment for troops and their families, offering stage productions and movies.

CMS was responsible for repairing all mechanical systems in the building, including the stage area itself, including HVAC and HVAC infrastructure. The work required draining, capping, demolishing, and removing existing mechanical, electrical, ductwork, and plumbing, and replacing all with a new high-efficiency system and components. HAZMAT abatement was performed during and after demolition and prior to installing new equipment.

The scope also included placing new concrete equipment pads, new walls, and electrical conduit and lines; adding direct digital controls; performing TAB (test/adjust/balance) and commissioning of the new system prior to turnover to the Government.

Design-Build Recapitalize Deep Draft Berthing Wharf C “Charlie”-2

Charlie2

Design-Build Recapitalize Deep Draft Berthing Wharf C “Charlie”-2

Location: Naval Station, Mayport, FL
Client: US Navy
Completion: 2017
Value: $26.5M

Highlights:

  • Upgraded and restored Wharf C-2, which was deteriorated from age and corrosion
  • Increased Wharf C-2’s maximum load handling and overall functionality
  • Increased Wharf C-2’s safety standards for Navy personnel

Role in US National Defense

Naval Station (NS) Mayport is one of three major Navy installations in the Jacksonville, FL area. Its mission is to sustain and enhance warfighter readiness. The recapitalized Wharf Charlie-2 berths multiple ships for loading and unloading cargo (including ordnance) and Navy personnel.

Scope

The objective of this project was to perform subaqueous/subterranean construction and repairs to result in extending the life of Wharf C-2 by 50 years. Wharf C “Charlie”-2 is one of two primary carrier piers (C-1 and C-2), both of which serve specialized services and are critical to the defense mission that is carried out in the Mayport Basin at Mayport Naval Station, Jacksonville, FL. The project’s period of performance was delayed by almost two years by a post-award order to perform an Environmental Assessment (EA) in the interest of protecting marine life in the Mayport Basin. The objective of the assessment was to measure the degree of incidental disturbance to marine life when using a vibratory method to drive piles. Two species of marine mammals were singled out as at-risk. In May 2014, the Office of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration authorized an incidental harassment authorization (IHA) for a period of time during which the method could be utilized, which allowed the project to go forward under a strictly-enforced environmental directive.

Design-Bid-Build Waterfront Emergency Generators

EmGen


Design-Bid-Build Waterfront Emergency Generators

Location:   Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, GA
Client:   US Navy
Completion:   2015
Value:
$15.9M

Highlights:

  • New construction of a ballistically hardened emergency generator building to minimize risks associated with natural disaster, blasts/ballistic attack, CBRN, EMP/HEMP
  • Weapons movement: During the movement of weapons the CMS crew was not allowed to be outdoors at the project site; CMS scheduled work around this factor so that work performed indoors would be performed during extended periods set aside for weapons movement


Role in US National Defense

Naval Submarine Base (NSB) Kings Bay, GA is the home port for US Navy Fleet ballistic missile nuclear submarines armed with Trident missile nuclear weapons. Its mission is to provide support to Fleet, Fighter, and Family.

Scope

This project consisted of the construction of a 7,535-SF ballistically-hardened emergency generator building to house and support two emergency backup generators, switchgear and control equipment. Included in the scope is an overhead bridge crane, external underground fuel storage, and utility and site improvements. The project also required climate-controlled space for all switchgear and generator controls and fire protection throughout. It includes a walled courtyard to house mechanical equipment such as, engine mufflers, heat exchangers, diesel engine intake air filter boxes and heat pumps. Just beyond the mechanical yard is the underground emergency fuel storage system. This area is made up of two underground fuel storage tanks, an underground containment tank, a truck fill area for offloading fuel and controls for the systems fueling and leak detection systems. Underground electrical feeders provide emergency power distribution through secure manholes and bullet-resistant aboveground structures to various facilities along the Waterfront Restricted Area in the event of a power outage. The site improvements include an asphalt access roadway, paved parking and storm water drainage features.

The new facility is an enclosed cast-in-place and precast concrete building with an EIFS finish. The main portion of the building is two stories with a one-story section having a walled-in area and the other side of the building having a removable wall in the event the generators would ever need to be removed/replaced. The ballistic screen wall is constructed of concrete masonry units with a concrete wall cap and ballistically rated mechanical gates. The main two-story section houses the two generators, while the smaller one-story section is the control room, housing the switchgear. It includes a bathroom. Interior finishes for the generator room includes painting concrete walls and ceilings, and sealing the concrete floor. The control room and bathroom are painted drywall with VCT flooring.

The site for the facility is raised approximately 7′ with structural fill, and the building foundations are spread footer style reinforced concrete over prepared subgrade. The screen wall foundations are CMU. The floors are concrete slab-on-grade, with the generator room having a built-in trench drain running around the raised generator pads.

The finished grade in the outside mechanical yard is aggregate base. New underground utility services include water, sanitary sewer with force main and lift station, fire supply water line and electrical and communications lines.

Design-Build Pacific Air Force Combat Communications Transmission Facility and Combat Communications Combat Support Facility

CCTS Facility

Design-Build Pacific Air Force Combat Communications Transmission Facility and Combat Communications Combat Support Facility

Location:   Andersen Air Force Base, Guam
Client:   US Navy
Completion:   2014
Value: $10.1M

Highlights:

  • 2014 National Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) Award of Excellence in Construction, Specialty $3M to $10M Category, for the Guam Combat Communications Support Facility and Transmission System Facility, Andersen Air Force Base, Guam
  • 2014 Award of Excellence in Construction, $3M to $10M Category, from the Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) Indiana/Kentucky Chapter for the Guam Combat Communications Support Facility and Transmission System Facility, Andersen Air Force Base, Guam
  • Both buildings achieved LEED Silver Certification

Role in US National Defense

The Pacific Air Force and 644th Combat Communication Squadron’s primary mission is to provide ready air and space power to promote US interests in the Asia-Pacific region during peacetime, through crisis and in war. The addition of two new structures, an 18,000 SF Transmission System Facility and a 10,000 SF Combat Support Facility, supports the continued success of the 644th Air Force Squadron in their defense mission.

Scope

CMS successfully completed the design and construction of the Combat Communication Combat Support Facility (CCCSF) and Combat Communication Transmission System Facility (CCTSF) working with design firm, ARCADIS. Both facilities were designed for the use of the 664th Combat Communications Squadron Operations to provide communications capabilities for combatant commanders in the Pacific AOR .The project involved the site development and construction of two new, single-story reinforced concrete buildings.

The scope included new HVAC, electrical, plumbing, and fire protection systems, utility and site work, and other improvements to complete a fully operational facility to support the mission of the 644th Combat Communication Squadron.

The 9,812-SF Combat Communications Transmission System Facility has administrative work areas and storage areas. The 18,043-SF Combat Communication Combat Support facility has training space, communication room, secure storage area, maintenance repair and staging area, and generator maintenance bays.

Both buildings have reinforced concrete foundations, precast walls, and roofing capable of withstanding typhoon-strength winds and high seismic activity. Plumbing and electrical devices and fixtures meet LEED requirements. Each facility is also protected by a fire sprinkler system, fire alarm and mass notification system, and mechanical ventilation to maintain indoor air quality. A demand control system with pressure transducer ventilates generator muffler exhaust in each bay of the CCCSF.

The new buildings were designed for strength and durability to withstand the severe weather events that are characteristic of Guam and to provide service for years to come. CMS took special measures to preserve Guam’s sensitive ecosystem, adding bioswales to reduce the amount of storm water entering the island’s water supply. This and other sustainable design features qualify the project for the US Green Building Council’s LEED Silver certification.

Design-Build Historical HVAC and A/C Upgrades and Repairs, Various Buildings

HVAC-&-AC-upgrades

Design-Build Historical HVAC and A/C Upgrades and Repairs, Various Buildings

Location:   Marine Corps Base, Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, HI
Client:   US Navy
Project Value: $4.5M
Completion:   2015

Highlights:

  • Received letter Exceptional performance ratings from the
    client.
  • Recipient of 2015 Award of Excellence from the Indiana/
    Kentucky Associated Builders and Contractors, Inc.

Historic Value

All five buildings in the scope of this project were present
and in operation during the Japanese invasion of the US in
1941. For this reason they are considered US historic
property and subject to special handling for renovation and
repair projects to maintain the integrity of historic indicators and
landmarks.

Scope

This project required demolition of the existing outdated
and inefficient heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC)
systems and installing new high-efficiency equipment. The new
systems were tested, adjusted, balanced, and commissioned
before delivery to the customer. All five buildings were present
and in operation during the Japanese invasion of the US in
1941. For this reason, all five buildings are considered historic
US property and subject to special handling for renovation and
repair projects to maintain the integrity of historic indicators and
landmarks.